Apple is one of the most common pairings with pork, and for good reason. Smokers are an amazing way to cook almost any meat. Taken from the loin of the pig, they have a generous fat layer on one side and sometimes have a small piece of bone left in. For an easy, juicy, flavorful dish, try making pan fried thick cut pork chops. A good digital thermometer isn't too expensive, and is by far the best kitchen tool to have! Thank-you. However, in order to tell whether a pork chop it done just by touching it, you need to be very experienced at cooking meat. Sear the pork chops for 2 minutes on each side. If you are concerned about the bag leaking, you could place it on top of a plate or in a small baking dish after adding the pork. Cooking pork on the stove can lock in more moisture, and there are multiple ways to go about it. If you left your pork chops in the marinade for, say, a week, then yes, the vinegar could break down the fibers of the meat. Have used this recipe several times now – amazing improvement over earlier attempts to not overcook. Marinating pork chops doesn't make them spoil faster than they otherwise would. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. You can buy a thick cut chop at almost any grocery, but you’ll probably have to ask for it. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/60\/Cook-Pork-Chops-on-the-Stove-Step-1.jpg\/v4-460px-Cook-Pork-Chops-on-the-Stove-Step-1.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/60\/Cook-Pork-Chops-on-the-Stove-Step-1.jpg\/aid3268553-v4-728px-Cook-Pork-Chops-on-the-Stove-Step-1.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":352,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":557,"licensing":"

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how to cook thick pork chops on the stove 2021